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ATA Chapter #94

ATA Chapter #94
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66. Counterfeits, fakes and intentionally created varieties: While some shun "created" and altered stamps, there are a lot of collectors who find them fascinating, if only as reference material for use in expertizing the genuine stamps. Some of the better examples in this category have significant value, especially counterfeits that have seen postal use. Chemically altered stamps, on the other hand, have little value. Stamps on which the colors have been altered by chemicals or by prolonged exposure to light are called changelings and are considered curiosities.


Type 66: Friend Wayne Youngblood has a little fun poking fun at the 4¢ make up rate stamp of 1991 (Scott 2521).


Type 66: How to make a "white" Old North Church? Dip the stamp in a common household product, and it will remove the blue coloring of the paper (originally, Scott 1603).


Type 66: Experiments with various chemicals left several different versions of the 1¢ Presidential of 1938 (Scott 804).


Type 66: The copy of Scott 815a on the right is a counterfeit.




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