EFOCC Home
Resources
The EFO
Collector
Auction
Honor Roll
EFOCC History
Club Business
Membership
Buyers/Sellers
Service Providers
Member Login
EFOS for Sale


APS Affiliate Member

APS Affiliate #103

Join APS

ATA Chapter #94

ATA Chapter #94
Click here for a printer friendly version of this essay.

39. Markings from perforating equipment on stamps: Stripper marks, from built-up ink on the mechanism that pulls the paper through the pins, are sometimes seen, especially on regular issues of the last 40 years. They have little worth beyond their curiosity value. An item with moderate value, but rarely seen, is the "smallpox" Gilbert Stuart "George 'Washington" coil of 1932. It came about because the Bureau of Engraving and Printing had to add linseed oil to a batch of unsatisfactory ink to make it usable. That lengthened drying time just enough to let rollers feeding the web of printed stamps through the perforator to pick up wet ink and deposit it later on trailing stamps. They are not easily detected and are hard to find. Value is $20 or so for a used copy.


Type 39: Left: Scott 1280. Right: Scott 1281. Both blocks show stripper marks across the top of the upper pair of 2¢ stamps, and in the right margin of the 3¢ stamps.


Type 39: The Gilbert Stuart "George Washington" "smallpox" coil (Scott 721).

Previous: Perforations partially doubled Markings from perforating equipment on stamps Next: Paper creases
Table of Contents Freaks  


 
John M. Hotchner
 
Errors, Freaks & Oddities
 
The EFO Collector
 
The Archives
 
John M. Hotchner
 
EFO Corner
 
The Columns
from Linn's
 
Articles By
 
Wayne Youngblood
AG
Files
 
Ryskamp
on
Computer-Vended Postage
 
Not
quite
EFOs

Home Copyright © 2005-2020 Errors, Freaks & Oddities Collectors' Club. All rights reserved.  

Use the search box below to search this website only. Results will appear below the search box. Search tips and hints